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1977197819791980198119821983198419851986198719881989

FOSTORIA EXCHANGE CLUB MEMBERS GET STATE, NATIONAL OFFICES
Thursday, November 6, 1986


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PIX #1 - Photograph taken when Fostoria's Municipal Pool was dedicated and a capacity crowd turned out for the ceremony

PIX #2 - Paul J. Carbin, chariman of the Fostoria Park Board (top left) and Willis J. Hakes, president of the Exchange Club, survey the deadly abandoned quarry on N. Countyline where children did their summer swimming.

AUTHOR'S NOTE: This the second of two articles about the Fostoria Exchange Club, which is observing its 65th birthday. The first article was in last week's edition.

Four times the Fostoria Exhange Club was recognized by representation on the Board of Control of the Ohio State Exchange Clubs. Those serving in that capacity were Carl Smith, Gordon Gray, Cloyce D. La Rue and Arnold Lungberg. Of course, Smith and Lungberg also served two terms on the Board of Control of the National officers.

During World War II the club devoted the major portion of its attention to the war effort, with a number of member's serving on local or area Civilian Boards. Exchangite Harry Losey was chairman of the Ration Board.

Members of the Club, Wallace Fisher, Raymond Haniq, Lawrence Harry, Dr. M.H. Karmasin and Dr. W.F. Stewart served in the armed forces.

DR. JOHN NORRIS AND OTHERS MADE HONORARY MEMBERS

When Dr. John Norris, Fostoria's well-known physician, became 88 years old he was made an Honorary Member of the Club in recognition of his 60 years of service to the community. Others in the club who were named Honorary members for long and distinguished membership were Eldon Fruth, Charles Latshaw, Floyd Smothers, Howard Timanus, and Paul Wagner.

In 1928, the F.H.S. graduating class dedicated the Red & Black Annual to the Fostoria Exchange Club for its service to the community.

The Durables is the title conferred on members of the Club who have been affiliated for more than twenty years, indicating a deep and sincere belief in the principles of Exchange. Here is the list and length of membership in years: Eldon R. Fruth (47) Charles Latshaw (44) Gordon Gray (44) Edmond Hoplins (44) Lester Stewart (40) Willis Hakes (39) Dr. Karmasin (38) George Jackman (34) Floyd Smothers (34) Arnold Lundberg (31) Richard Collins (30) Francis Bormuth (29) Richard Zeyen (28) Howard Timanus (28) Cyril Kuhn (27) Carl gillig (27) Frank Lance (2) Elmer Lloyd (27) Lester Barnes (26) Charles Wagner (25) Eugene Zuber (24) Paul Wagner (23)

The present offices of Fostoria Exchange Club are: President, Ken Price; President Elect, Sam Opp; Secretary, K. Speelman; Treasurer A. Shumaker

The history about Exchange, locally would not be complete without exploring the organization from a national standpoint...where and how it got its start ...where...by whome...its reason for birth, etc.

HOW EXCHANGE BECAME NATIONAL ORGANIZATION

It was in 1896, during the Gay Nineties when a group of men, a cross section of Detroit's business and professional community, first met for no more mobile purpose than to eat lunch. Initially, the meetings were occasional and informal. They were friends who simply enjoyed the pleaure of each other's company. They swapped stories, compared views, advised and counseled each other on the conduct of business. The idea of recruiting represenatives from the varied businesses and professions of the city gradually developed into the group known as the "Boosters Club", took on many of the attributes of a luncheon club.

DETROIT MAN FORMED THE FIRST CLUB IN 1911

One of the energentic members of the old Boosters' Club was Charles A. Berkey a Detroit wholesale jeweler, who, in the course of time, carried the spirit and principles of this group into the formal organization of the first Exchange Club, on March 27, 1911.

The first meeting of the new organization was held at a noon luncheon in a small room of the Penobscot Inn, on the Fort Street side of the basement of the Penobscot Building, Detroit.

The early records disclose the standards they set for accceptance of members: "The idea of most importance to us was that we should take only members in whom we could place implicit confidence...men who were real men, and who lived up to the old fashioned ideas of truth and integrity in their relationships with one another". the principle of service soon became the very essence of all club activity.

In 1913, a group of businessmen formed their own Exchange Club in Toledo, Ohio. Soon there were Exchange Clubs in Cleveland, Ohio and Grand Rapids, Michigan.

NATIONAL EXCHANGE BORN IN TOLEDO IN 1917

In response to the growing interest in Exchange, represenatives of the four existing Exchange Club met in toledo in August, 1917 and formally incorporated The National Exchange Clubs as a non-profit organization under Ohio laws. A month later, on Setp. 18, 1917, the new organization held its first convention in Toledo. Only 22 Exchangites attended that first national meeting, but the basic tenets of organization and purpose which they established were to serve as guiding principles for tens of thousands of men across the nation for decades there after.

It was during the first convetion that the motto, "Unity for Service" was adopted. In words of its originator, Mr. Berkey, who attended that first convention and was to be named the first National president, the inspiration for the motto came from the 123rd Psalm in the Bible..."Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethern to dwell together in unity".

There, you have the story about EXCHANGE...its births...its growth...how it came to Fostoria and its record here.

HAPPY 65TH TO ALL PAST AND PRESENT EXCHANGITES!!!

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